building my first own pc question

Discussion in 'Hardware Discussion & Support' started by Mort_Cinder, Feb 16, 2005.

  1. Mort_Cinder

    Mort_Cinder I want some ATI lovin'

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    hi. i am new to building my own pc, but i heard it is so much cheaper and better. my question is: i plan to buy all the components from the internet (mobo, gfx, processor,etc) will i be able to put everything together easily or do i have to buy extra cables, fans and other things. my knowledge is very small and if i could mess it up i might get it prebuilt instead. thanks for the help.
     
  2. bananaman

    bananaman banana muncher

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    Hi,

    It should all be pretty easy, just research some parts and serarch forums like these and even look at peoples sigs and look at their computers

    here is a very basic guide to comp buidling, but have a search on google and look for more guides

    http://www.insanetek.com/index.php?page=compassembly

    If you go slow, do your research and read the manuals etc. before you build you can hardly go wrong - it is most like electronic lego really!

    You should get all the cables you need and most new cases will come with a fan or two, so you should be set.

    If I were you I would think about what you will use the system for, your budget, do some research and then post your porposed spec on the forum for ppl to have a look at

    nana
     
  3. Iridium

    Iridium New Member

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    This all sounds like very good advice, no other way about it IMO. I would recommend posting hyperlinks to the specific product at the site you plan on buying from so everyone can look and see if there is anything missing that you might not be aware of.


    Don't get discouraged and buy a prebuilt PC. You will get more for your money, more stable, and a much better performer if you build your own.


    Overclocking isn't an option on most prebuilt machines either. SoftFSB can sometimes allow OC'ing the Front Side Bus speed on prebuilt machines, but if you plan on ever OC'ing you would be better off building your own. In most cases OC'ing a rig is really free extra performance. If you keep your OC in check and don't go extreme with the heat and voltage, you aren't really in danger of shortening the life expectancy any more than what the PC's useful life will be anyways.


    In most every case coming to a forum like this or others on the web will get you better technical support than what is offered my major manufacturers too, IMHO.
     
  4. topbob

    topbob New Member

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    yea, read some guides, and your pretty much set, its actually not that hard at all, it is quite a bit cheaper, and custom built pcs are very easy to upgrade once the time comes.
    if only i knew this 3 years ago when i bought my Dell >:/
    now im stuck with a computer i upgraded to its max limit, course its enough for now, but i have a few problems due to the fact its a Dell mobo, 4x agp, pc1066 RDRAM which is slow, and i cannot even put a HT chip in it.
    custom building is the way to go ;)
     
  5. Sandok

    Sandok New Member

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    I built my first PC last year and well... Don't worry mate, not too hard :p I didn't even read the manuals. Seems logical. I used my dad's old P3 500mhz as a reference (look in it and try to setup everything like it was in it... :duh: )
     
  6. itchy5

    itchy5 New Member

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    just dont get a prescott its not a good first build chip :rolleyes: runs to hot for a newbie to mannage ;)
     
  7. Mort_Cinder

    Mort_Cinder I want some ATI lovin'

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    well, thanks a lot for the replies. the advice has been very helpful. i will start looking around for the components and hope i have fun building my own pc. thanks again. :)
     
  8. technonerd

    technonerd New Member

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    I even start building comp at age 16 with no problem.
     
  9. Iridium

    Iridium New Member

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    And as a person with a high clock speed Intel chip, get an AMD if you are a gamer, and look for a Nforce 4 chipset motherboard. You will be very happy. The AMD 3200+ is a great processor for the price and overclocks well.
     
  10. itchy5

    itchy5 New Member

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    good old 3200+ winch :D good OCage there :rofl:
     
  11. Mort_Cinder

    Mort_Cinder I want some ATI lovin'

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    i have a good budget, so i was considering the AMD 3500+. how good is it good for overclocking?
     
  12. bananaman

    bananaman banana muncher

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    A64 3500 is a good chip for OCing, although if you are really planning to overclock it might be worth getting the 3200 Winchester chip and putting the saved money into really high quiality RAM based of the TCCD chip - such as G.Skill - which should allow a nice all round overclock. i think that the difference in overclockability is not too great between the 3200 and the 3500 (if any at all really)

    nana

    nana
     
  13. Vasot

    Vasot Banned

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    Buy a Athlon 64 3200+ or 3500+ the difference in performance is small


    Avoid the P4 Prescot they suck as a Performance\value\price
    except if you care about Media proccesing etc

    I am a graphic designer and my Pentium 4 was a better choice for the programs i use from a Athlon 64
    But i maybe buy a Athlon 64 proccesor in my Next PCI-express update
     
  14. Iridium

    Iridium New Member

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    This is good advice. From what I have read, if you are going to OC, you might as well save that money that you would spend on the 3500+ and do just like nana said and invest it in some high quality, low latency ram. That will be a good base to work with, very solid. :)

    This article:
    Athlon 64 3200+ 90nm (S939) - The next P4 2.4 "C" ?

    should be all you need to look at to decide on the 3200+.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2005
  15. Mort_Cinder

    Mort_Cinder I want some ATI lovin'

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    thanks Iridium for the great link. i am now convinced that a 3200+ is the way to go!!!
     
  16. Drakon

    Drakon New Member

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    i decided to get a 3500+ instead of a 3200+ the price difference wasn't that big at the time I bought mine. i love my 3500+ though. haven't oc'ed it as yet...

    Here's a review from Anandtech comparing a 90nm 3500+ to a 90nm 3000+ along with some other cpu's. this helped in my decision of choosing which cpu to go with.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2005

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