Covid 19

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Forum' started by Trusteft, Mar 11, 2020.

  1. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

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    As long as my friends and family survive this, and you guys close ones too, then we have won.

    Everyone stay safe, I hope the best for all of you and yours.
     
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  2. arb65912

    arb65912 Well-Known Member

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    I wish everybody is safe and does not need to survive... well, time will tell. Keeping my fingers crossed.
     
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  3. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

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    Finland Deploys COVID-19 Sniffer Dogs At The Airport:

    We’ve all seen how dogs are deployed at checkpoints along the border or at airports to help sniff out drugs and other illegal substances that people should not be bringing into a country, but could sniffer dogs also be used to sniff out diseases in people, like the coronavirus? Apparently so, or that’s what Finnish researchers believe.

    It seems that researchers from the country have high hopes of the effectiveness of sniffer dogs at detecting the coronavirus, so much so that they have deployed four of them at the Helsinki airport where based on preliminary tests, the dogs were able to sniff out the virus in people with “nearly 100%” accuracy, even if the person has not developed any symptoms.

    When a dog thinks that a person has the virus, it will then either start to yelp, paw at the ground, or lie down, after which the person is then given a PCR test to help verify the dog’s suspicions. At the moment it is unclear what it is that dogs can smell that might give them an indication that a person has the coronavirus.
    ____________________
    Source: ubergizmo
     
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  4. arb65912

    arb65912 Well-Known Member

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    Hmm, never read about it. can not wait to find out what the dogs smell.
     
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  5. Dyre Straits

    Dyre Straits 10 Grandkids -2 Great-grandsons

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  6. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

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  7. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    I think that dogs are relatively safe, compared to humans. There have been a handful of documented cases, but they are so few and far between that it's a very unlikely occurrence.

    I agree with Mr Cairo's remark from the last page, I think that, while they do always tell us that this is terrible to make the masses behave correctly (quote from our prez from, I think, March: "No graveyard will be big enough" unless we take care), the numbers are almost universally being tuned and current situation downplayed to keep borders as open as possible and productivity as close to normal.

    It is hard to say what is the right approach. If you look at the great documented pandemics of the past, usually, the communities who took the strictest measures fared best, with fewer casualties and the economy that would temporarily grind to a halt, but would spring back once everything was over, while those that tried to make compromises ended losing both battles, with the diseases ravaging them due to insufficient preventive measures and then economy tanking, and often taking decades or even longer to fully recover, due to too many people getting sick and dying. Having said that, those were usually outbreaks of plague and smallpox that were recorded and this, while not "ordinary flu", isn't the plague either, so it's hard to say what's the best approach. After all, an economic downturn has its indirect cost in lives as well. With all the data that has been gathered on this disease, I think that it would be a good idea to reassess everything - the death rate, the frequency of long term consequences in those who recovered, the degree of collective immunity within communities etc and decide what makes the most sense further on, but I'm afraid that the topic is too politicized at this point to do it properly.

    Overall, I'm still in the "better safe than sorry" camp, especially with a vaccine being probably less than a year away.
     
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  8. arb65912

    arb65912 Well-Known Member

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    That is exactly what I am thinking... too politicized, who would make an objective judgement? No idea.
     
  9. Dyre Straits

    Dyre Straits 10 Grandkids -2 Great-grandsons

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    When the "experts" can't reach a consensus, how are we "mere mortals" suppose to do so?
     
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  10. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    As far as I am concerned, wash your hands regularly when you go out, even if (as I do) wear plastic gloves. Wear a mask at all times when outside. Don't touch your face at all when outside, hell I rarely touch my face when I am inside and with clean hands.
    If you see a ton of people in small spaces, avoid it.
    Clean anything that you are bringing in home. Boxes, parcels, fucking anything.
    When I return from the super market I spend an extra 5 min, 10 top to do that. Once a week I can afford to do so...
    Simple precautions.
    If the scientists are wrong, all I get is some mild discomfort for few months or a year if it continues. If I follow the covididiots and they are wrong I risk dying or suffering and/or make others do so because I wasn't careful enough and spread it.

    For me people who I place them under the covididiot term are people who growing up never had even a little proper upbringing. Or are morons.
     
  11. Mr Cairo

    Mr Cairo Require backup .... NO

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    every piece of evidence I have see says if your not a healthcare professional ..Dont wear gloves
     
  12. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    I will take my chances.
    They were saying don't wear masks at first, remember?
    Regardless, I rather have some extra safety than not.
     
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  13. Mr Cairo

    Mr Cairo Require backup .... NO

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    true but as you walk into most shops or areas now you tend to Gel you hands and clean off any germs people wearing gloves tend to not do this so they spread around what they bring in

    TBH though if it works for you and makes you feel safer stick with it
     
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  14. arb65912

    arb65912 Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, you will hear what you want to just by reaching certain source.

    That is why it is so hard to make a judgment.
    The downside of Internet (despite of many great things) is that you can pretty much get any info backed up with "research" you want to believe in....
     
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  15. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

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    Global death toll from COVID-19 surpasses 1 million

    More than 1 million people have died worldwide as a result of the novel coronavirus as of Monday evening, according to tracking numbers from John Hopkins University. The grim milestone comes less than a week after the number of deaths linked to COVID-19 in the US surpassed 200,000.

    More than 33 million people have tested positive for the coronavirus, more than 7 million of whom are in the US.
    ____________________
    Source: cnet
     
  16. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

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    Folding@home's COVID-19 research now runs up to 60% faster on Nvidia GPUs

    As of yesterday, Folding@home efforts are being powered up with CUDA support. Nvidia is stepping up to the front line to provide GPU acceleration, courtesy of its parallel computing platform, CUDA, in order to help evaluate and synthesise the sheer volume of molecules necessary in the battle against the ongoing global pandemic. So, projects like COVID Moonshot are going to get a serious boost in the fight against COVID-19. Where the fate of the world hangs in the balance, more processing power certainly doesn’t go amiss.

    CUDA support means most projects using the open-source Folding@home distributed computing tech (based on the OpenMM toolkit) will be looking at a minimum of 15-30% performance increase from most standard GPUs, with some pushing a lot more. Nvidia Geforce GTX 660, 670 and 680 cards have even benchmarked upwards of 50-60% speed mark-ups.

    COVID Moonshot Sprints is on another level. It uses OpenMM features to figure out how much of an impact potential drugs will have, and this can see speedups of 50-100% on many GPUs. On the top end of the spectrum, CUDA-enabled COVID Moonshot projects, ones that identify potential therapy, are benchmarking a whopping 50-400% performance increase with GPU acceleration.
    ____________________
    Source: pcgamer
     
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  17. Tyrsonswood

    Tyrsonswood HH's curmudgeon

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    "Just slow down the testing and there will be less cases" ~ Donald J. Trump
     
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  18. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

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    Donald Trump's ass has been nailed to the wall since his tax information came out, for 11 of the 15 or 18 years they checked he never paid -any- taxes at all, and for one year he paid a measly 700 dollars, he's also close to going bankrupt as all his businesses are going under, so w/e.
     
  19. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    that's factually incorrect.
     
  20. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

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    Then what is correct, like that's what they said on CNN, or something along those lines, I may have gotten the numbers wrong (I'm no analyst) but I believed it was loosely correct.
     

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