Doximity, the LinkedIn for Doctors, Is Apparently Rampant With Vaccine Misinformation

Discussion in 'Industry News' started by Calliers, Aug 8, 2021.

  1. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator/Editor Staff Member

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    Medical professionals have become some of the most important individuals in society during the pandemic, working countless hours to save the lives of covid-19 patients and encouraging the public to get vaccinated. However, it appears that even the medical community isn’t immune to the vaccine misinformation plaguing the internet.

    A new CNBC report has found that Doximity, a social media network for doctors with 1.8 million members, including 80% of physicians in the U.S., is rampant with misinformation spread by professionals who are supposed to be grounded in science. If you’ve never heard of Doximity, it’s because you’re not a doctor. Only practicing medical professionals can join the social network, and their credentials, such as their medical license and hospital badge, are verified by the company. Users also can’t post their own content. They’re only allowed to comment on content posted by Doximity.

    The closed community and verification aspect only makes the misinformation being posted more worrisome. Doximity is purportedly full of comments posted by physicians that claim covid-19 vaccines are experimental, unproven, or deadly. Some refer to Dr. Anthony Fauci, the White House’s chief medical advisor, as “Fauxi.” Other doctors have claimed the antibodies that develop when people become infected with the virus are more effective than vaccines.
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    Source: gizmodo
     
  2. arb65912

    arb65912 Well-Known Member

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    That is very interesting.

    So if doctors are not the ones who we supposed to know better and trust than who should we trust? Media? :D

    Definitely there IS a reason if many doctors spread "misinformation".
     
  3. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    anything that doesn't tow the line.. is labeled misinformation, conspiracy, etc... it's not like it's some group of misinformed people making absurd claims, a massive amount that are all from scientific backgrounds simply don't have a consensus on the matter.
     

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