Haswell and DDR3-1600

Discussion in 'Hardware Discussion & Support' started by Uxot, Mar 17, 2014.

  1. Uxot

    Uxot Active Member

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  2. Takaharu

    Takaharu Unus offa, unus iuguolo

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    Yes, if you overclock your CPU to liquid-cooling levels and run 2.4GHz RAM that costs hundreds of pounds, yes, the RAM speed makes a difference.

    It's debatable whether you'd see any real-life difference between 1333MHz and 1866MHz if the only thing that you change is the RAM.
     
  3. Uxot

    Uxot Active Member

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    Ok thanks
     
  4. mkk

    mkk Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, because of a motherboard problem I've been playing Battlefield 4 with DDR3-1600 memory in just single channel mode for a while, halving the maximum possible RAM bandwidth. Even then I've been fine together with an i5 and an R9 290 graphics card at a steady 70 Hz since the Mantle update. I'm sure that I'm losing performance, but it's not significant even in this situation.

    In a more special case like running with a 144 Hz monitor and the game at low graphics settings, I don't doubt that it could make more of a difference.
     
  5. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    getting a server runtime error for that link..




    DDR3 1333mhz vs 1600mhz vs 1866mhz vs 2133mhz vs 2400mhz....


    even for haswell... the actual real world benefits moving even from 1333mhz to 2400mhz is very minimal.


    1600-1866mhz is about the sweet spot for DDR3 in almost all systems built in the last few years. Anything faster show really nill significance.


    They've pushed DDR3 and the memory controller tech to it's maximum value. It's kinda like DDR2 at anything much above PC6400 (800mhz) which basically is useless.... Yet PC8500 and 10660 kits were made that basically only benefitted those whom were trying to overclock a lot and needed stable ram able to withstand higher frequencies.


    For the last few years I've been purchasing for my machines I build for customers.... 1866 or 2133mhz kits... even though they'll remain running at 1866mhz or 1600mhz in most of the machines these kits are fitted with (due to limitations.. as the 1st and 2nd generation i3 models didn't support higher frequencies), the breathing room usually means more reliable/better stability and long life span... Also means upgrading a components such as the cpu would me that the ram would be a bottleneck yet in the event that the i5 or i7 installed allowed for better memory speeds.
     
  6. Uxot

    Uxot Active Member

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    So its like OC'ing 1600 to 2400(or w/e is the max of the RAM speed)..not really worth? but people still do it?
     
  7. mkk

    mkk Well-Known Member

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    It gives great scores in some synthetical benchmarks. Some really love to see high numbers in there even if they kinda realise that it's not representing what they get in a real world situation.
     
  8. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    even in synthetic benchmarks ... the improvement from 1600mhz to 2400mhz is usually marginal at best..... sometimes you see a 15% improvement or some specific tests may just got crazy for no apparent reason..


    but get down to brass tacts in a real world situation like.. lets say.. something heavily memory based like some of the things in adobe photoshop, and you might see a change of only half a percent.... maybe 2 at most...




    It's simply due to the ceiling being hit..... that's it..


    Until DDR4 arrives with it's massive changes in the overall memory system and how it operates, we simply aren't going to see anything change, right now memory providers are more interested in bumping capacities up rather than seeing speed increases. And even then I think majority of their effort is bringing DDR4 to the table.


    Haswell already is supposed to have native DDR4 support built in, It's just that it's taken WAY longer for it to finally materialize for the general consumers. We'll also see a fleet of new Socket 1150 Motherboards flow out when it finally comes.
     
  9. Uxot

    Uxot Active Member

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    So it would be the same for VRAM? or its completely different?
     
  10. mkk

    mkk Well-Known Member

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    Graphics memory bandwidth can always become a bottleneck if the resolution and bandwidth demanding effects like AntiAliasing are high enough. We've reached a level to todays better cards that gaming at a regular 1080p resolution is not too demanding unless a lot of AntiAliasing is also applied, but as monitors with higher resolutions become more common in the future we'll eventually have plenty of reasons to find ways to improve graphics memory bandwidth further. If 4K display prices keep falling we'll see gamers wanting to do crazy things like 4K triple display setups, which will make any of todays graphics cards run crying home to momma. ;)

    On the RAM front we'll be seeing DDR4 coming to consumer systems in 2015, with raw performance not being the leading factor right in the beginning. But rather other reasons like lower power consumption and simplified motherboard layouts, where most consumer boards likely to be limited to two DDR4 RAM slots. Performance gains will show up later in the form of really high frequencies that wont be easy to manufacture early on, but then again few systems will have little need for it on the RAM side. Workstation platforms with quad channel DDR4 is scheduled to appear already this year, but such setups are going to be quite pricey I'm sure.
     
  11. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    vram... you mean on a video card?


    Completely different situation... though it works in much the same way.... there is a point where the fastest memory on a midrange or low end gpu is simply pointless...


    For example if I stuffed 2000mhz memory on a amd hd 6450...... the gpu core on that sucker just simply wouldn't really be able to do much with the crazy high frequency memory.... it's all about bottlenecks and such... sure there'd be a barely registered improvement in most of the real world results... but otherwise..... kinda wasted.
     
  12. Neshi

    Neshi HH's cuddly Blue Bear

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    it's all about finding the right balance..
     

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