"Imperceptible" skin records wearers' finger pressure

Discussion in 'Industry News' started by Calliers, Nov 21, 2020.

  1. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Messages:
    55,428
    Likes Received:
    4,021
    Trophy Points:
    139
    Although we've already heard about pressure-sensitive "skins" that could be applied to robotic or prosthetic appendages, Japanese scientists have created one for use on real human fingers. And while you might wonder why they bothered, it actually has an interesting potential application.

    The ultra-thin yet tough "nanomesh sensor" was built by a team at the University of Tokyo, led by Sunghoon Lee. It's made up of four layers, one of which is an insulating polyurethane mesh, and another of which consists of a network of electrically conductive gold lines – these lines serve as the pressure-sensing electrodes.

    The porous membrane is thin enough that when applied to a person's fingertip, it doesn't affect their sense of touch or their ability to grasp objects. At the same time, though, it's very durable. When applied to the fingertips of 18 test subjects, it was reportedly "imperceptible" to the wearer, plus it remained intact and functional even after being rubbed against an unyielding surface 300 times.

    [​IMG]
    ____________________
    Source: newatlas
     
  2. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2004
    Messages:
    55,428
    Likes Received:
    4,021
    Trophy Points:
    139
    Cyberpunk 2077 anyone?
     

Share This Page

visited