LG TVs Will Now Automatically Disable the Dreaded Motion Smoothing for Prime Video

Discussion in 'Industry News' started by Calliers, Oct 30, 2021.

  1. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator/Editor Staff Member

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    Beginning this week, LG’s 2020 and 2021 4K and 8K smart TVs will roll out an update that will allow viewers to automatically watch their Amazon Prime Video content in Filmmaker Mode, “the way the content creators intended it.” That’s a slightly nicer way of saying that Prime Video users will soon be able to automatically disable many of the dreaded, unnatural picture processing features that most smart TVs now come preloaded with by default.

    Known colloquially as the “sports effect” or the “soap opera effect,” motion smoothing or motion interpolation is the process by which smart TVs try to correct for some of the blurriness that can be inherent to them. While most movies and shows are shot at 24 frames per second (fps), most of the fancy high-end TVs you can buy today have lightning-fast refresh rates, which means they’re generally capable of reconstructing more frames than are available to them. That discrepancy can create a choppy, laggy effect on any media that was shot at 24 fps—almost like a blurring effect. To solve for this, smart TV manufacturers developed motion smoothing technology, which is capable of creating new frames to sort of fill in the gaps and “trick” your eyes into thinking you’re viewing something seamless.

    The problem, though, is most people absolutely hate this. Many complain that motion smoothing has the unintended consequence of creating the aforementioned “soap opera effect,” where everything looks over-processed and hyperreal. But despite being nearly universally reviled by viewers, directors, and Tom Cruise, TV manufacturers often preload their products with the feature by default.

    LG first debuted Filmmaker Mode as a setting option back in 2020, but viewers had to root around in their settings menu each time they wanted to toggle the feature on—a seemingly minor inconvenience that quickly becomes completely obnoxious when you have to do it every single time you turn your TV on.
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    Source: gizmodo
     
  2. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    dumb.....

    ever since 2008 when it first really started to emerge with image interpolation of additional calculated frames... it's incredibly pleasing to see. only the "mah 23.976fps is sacred"... "it's the way film was intended to be and video!" which is absurd, a standard landed on that was determined because it was the lowest frame rate audiences universally accepted that was most cost effective and material effective, otherwise many films would have been shot far higher frame rates
     
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  3. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    I don't know, really. Watching any kind of content with motion smoothing always produces an uneasy feeling in me. Even before I knew what it was, I'd look at someone's new fancy TV and think to myself that there was something weird.

    EDIT: I don't think I have an issue with content that was genuinely shot at a higher framerate. Generally, I find YouTube 60fps videos fine. I also don't think that I could tell apart those and others that have a lower framerate. But motion smoothing... I think I'd always recognize it. I don't see a distortion of any kind, but... It's somehow a similar sensation to watching handheld footage. I don't know if it makes sense, but they both "hit" me in a very similar way.
     
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  4. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator/Editor Staff Member

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    I don't see what's so bad about motion smoothing, to me everything looks right.

    Maybe it's because I have to where glasses and don't have 20/20 vision.
     
  5. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    Nah, my vision isn't perfect either. Maybe it's the older, less sophisticated implementations of motion smoothing that I notice as weird and the newer stuff is better. I don't really own a proper TV, so I can't tell (I have an old CRT that belonged to my grandparents that I use more as a prop or decoration than anything else and when I do watch video content it's usually on my PC monitor or tablet, or sometimes phone).
     
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  6. Calliers

    Calliers Administrator/Editor Staff Member

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    Dude, you should definitely invest in a better TV, you can get some nice ones now for not too much. Wait till around Xmas and gift yourself one, there's something about watching a good show or movie on a nice big screen that's got 4K and HDR, it's a real treat. :)
     

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