Light Bulb Flicker When Turning On After Long Time Off.

Discussion in 'Hardware Discussion & Support' started by sew333, Feb 18, 2021.

  1. sew333

    sew333 Member

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    Hello. I have question. I dont know if i have faulty wiring,bad installation or its bulb. When i have lights off long time and turn on ceiling lightning ( bulb halogen or fluorescent? ) , there is a for 2-3 second bulb dimm/flicker and its normal/fine. Happens only when lightning is off long time and i turn on.

    When i turn off lights and turn on again its fine. That flicker/dimm happens only when lights are off long time.That happens for example if i have lights off 2-3 hours and turn on.Thx



    Why it happens only after lights are off for long time?

    Bulb looking like that here:

    https://www.destinationlighting.com/images/products_zoom/150/17150~zoom.jpg







    I have an expensive PC to plug in my house so i am worried. THx
     
  2. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    Does it still happen if you change the bulb?

    No matter what, get a surge protector at the very least, for that PC.
     
  3. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    That type of light bulb (compact fluorescent lamp) needs time to "warm up" after being turned on and it can get more pronounced as it ages. Also, it is similar to old fluorescent tube lights and I'm sure you've seen old ones flicker around various offices. That should be what you are experiencing.
     
  4. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    please... stop.... surge protectors do utterly jack. Even the expensive ones. In fact surge protectors are likely to CAUSE problems these days than prevent. Literally just solved yet again another computer related issue that was directly caused by a surge protector a customer of mine was using.

    If anyone is going to spend any money on their home entertainment or computer, the very least a 750va UPS is about the minimum these days for most common desktops.
     
  5. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    No.
    Get a good one. Not a shit one.
    You don't need to get an a UPS.
    A GOOD surge protector will help your equipment.
    Just don't cheap out. Also check reviews of it.
     
  6. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    Provide me a link to a "good one".


    I've dealt with surge units in excess of $100... not one of them passed thorough testing and still failed to do their shops in excess of voltage.

    Also the worst part isn't over voltage, it's under voltage which no surge bar that i'm aware of has a cut off for.

    When was the last time you ever reset a surge bar?
     
  7. Trusteft

    Trusteft HH's Asteroids' Dominator

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    I am not going to do research for you.
    A good start is APC.


    EDIT: I sound like an asshole here, not my intention.
     
  8. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    Will under voltage hurt my gear? I understand that it can cause the system to crash, but I'm not that scared of that.

    I've been eyeing USPs from time to time, but so far I've been too stingy to get one - cheapo ones are potentially more terrible than benefit and those others, well they aren't cheap.

    I do have a surge bar and it is by APC, so I hope that it's ok. I've had it for a couple of years and haven't had any problems with it. Having said that, I haven't really had problems before, as on the rare occasion when lights would flicker (and, very rarely, even the TV), the PSU would still manage to straight things up and PC wouldn't skip a beat.
     
  9. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    Many years ago i thought APC had a good surge protector too.... sadly that's exactly what i removed from several users units to solve their problem. Complete garbage.
     
  10. Judas

    Judas Obvious Closet Brony Pony

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    Over voltage can be compensated for before they will trip before doing any damage. Under voltage doesn't have a trip state, instead what happens is at least for many PSUs, the brown out/droop in voltage is offset by eating amperage like mad in order to try and deliver the desired power to the components, this will often be the point things tend to fry from heat. Voltage isn't heat, you need a hell of a lot of voltage to do something bad in most cases.

    As for UPSes, while true getting el-cheapos isn't a wise idea, i tend to source Cyberpower 750/900va's with AVR... in fact i've another 5 of them going out the door here shortly. I've solved a lot of people's problems by getting them up and running on UPSes. If someone has something far more important to cover though, i tend to suggest the more expensive sinewave based APC UPSes with avr.

    Considering what you're essentially protecting, spending $115-130 for the UPSes i get as mentioned above, and it's about $300 for the APC 1000-1500va with sinewave.

    It's often not a bad idea to also get a multi-meter reading of your target source plug, as well as make sure it's an isolated plug from other circuits if possible. There are WAY too many people with microwaves, fridges, or other appliances shared on the same circuit as their pc and they wonder why life is miserable for them.

    Also it's depressing how many people will plug their house fan in on the same circuit as their pc or other electronics. the more often than not DC motors in these units are making a royal mess of the power on that circuit and some of them can be so bad they can buggered with nearby circuits at the panel.
     

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