Ubisoft now giving out its Assassin’s Creed educational tours of Greece and Egypt for free

Discussion in 'Gaming News Discussion' started by Calliers, May 15, 2020.

  1. Calliers

    Calliers Is turning over a new leaf..... Staff Member

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    Ubisoft is offering free downloads of its educational tours of ancient Greece and ancient Egypt, which are based on the studio’s recreations of those worlds in Assassin’s Creed Origins and Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, the studio announced today. The tours will be free to claim until May 21st.

    You can download Discovery Tour: Ancient Greece and Discovery Tour: Ancient Egypt from Ubisoft’s website here, though you’ll need a Uplay account to claim them.
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    Source: theverge
     
  2. Calliers

    Calliers Is turning over a new leaf..... Staff Member

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    This is a great promotion for kids, all the exploration and education minus the violence.
     
  3. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    I got and tried the Egyptian one (I also have the Greek version included in AC:O, but I haven't taken a look at it yet). I don't know if I'll go through everything, but I like it so far. Here's a short review based on my first impressions.

    The software includes the entire map of Egypt from the game, fully populated by NPCs going about their business. That means that you can roam around freely and enjoy the scenery uninterrupted. I quite enjoy it, since, during the game and due to its sheer size, I often felt pressured to go through things as quickly as possible, because I didn't have too much gaming time. I also noticed that, if you approach groups of NPCs, spots on the ground light up and if you go to an empty one, you will join the NPCs. I'm not sure if there is a way to interact with them, or you can just watch as your character engages with them on it's own. BTW, you are walking around as Aya by default, but a number of different characters is available.

    As for the guided tours themselves, there are around 75 of them strewn around the map. When you start one, a path on the ground lights up and as you follow it, you come across a number of "stops", where the game tells you something about the topic. Usually, in those moments, the camera will move to give you a better view of what's being talked about and you will also be offered to view a related visual "exhibit", such as an image of a related historic artifact, a map, a work of art depicting the topic or some concept art that was created for the game. A neat feature is that, apparently your surrounding may change to depict what you're watching: I was on the "Siege of Alexandria" tour and everything looked fairly normal, but as I got out of the palace, the gardens were ablaze and buildings damaged, as if a battle had just taken place there (at least I haven't noticed any fires or ruins going to the palace, so I think that it was changed while I was walking).

    From what I've seen, a single tour can have between 3 and over 20 points and an individual point may contain between a couple of sentences and about a minute of narration. So far, it was mostly very accessible, but as you go through more and more content, you will build up a certain body of information about the ancient Egypt.

    I do have to note, though, that things may seem a little jumbled up. Individual points usually contain 4-5 sentences, which may leave blanks between individual points of a story. That's something I feel they could have done a little better. In the least, if they wanted to keep the tours and individual points short so that they remain accessible to a young audience and to keep them from getting tedious, they could have added slightly longer versions of the texts which the user/player could click to expand. I'm sure that little nerds would also appreciate that they could get some extra info on the topics they found particularly interesting. Another thing they could have easily added are the labels on the map which would mark different points of interest (for example, in Alexandria: the palace, the library, the theater etc). I looked a little, but there doesn't seem to be a way to get those, only the nomes and towns are marked (along with fast travel locations and places where individual tours start).

    One small niggle, or just a thing that I found weird, was that they covered the breasts of statues with seashells, a la Little Mermaid. It's weird, out of place and apparently can't be turned off. I guess I understand their decision, but... whatever.

    So, on the whole, it's a nice piece of software. As far as I understand, the concept has been developed a bit further in Odyssey, but I'm yet to try it out.
     
  4. IvanV

    IvanV HH Assassin Guild Member

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    I played the Greek counterpart for a few minutes just to see what it's like. The first thing I noticed was that they addressed my main complaint about DT Egypt. The narration at individual points within a tour is slightly more substantial and they also added the "read more" option for those looking for some extra facts. The map seems to contain a few more labels, although major individual buildings (unless there is a dedicated tour for them) are still unmarked. The Greek version also contains the "historic nudity" toggle, at least the one that comes with the Season Pass for the game, which is rated 17+ by ESRB and 18 by PEGI anyway, I can't guarantee for the standalone version.

    Another minor change I was able to notice in the very brief time I had with the title is that now there are individual points of interest to be found around the map. They are not part of any particular tour and they aren't shown on the main map, but they appear on the compass and Ikaros can see them. There are once again several characters to choose from as your avatar, but this time a part of them has to be unlocked by completing a particular tour or finding a certain number of points of interest. They have also added "tour guides", famous Greeks from the ancient period, who greet you at the beginning and the end of a tour and with whom you can have a short dialog and who might give you a quiz after you've done the tour.

    In all, this Discovery Tour is very it's very similar to its predecessor, but it's that little bit more substantial on the educational side and perhaps a tiny bit more engaging.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2020 at 10:53 PM

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